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acupuncture:evaluation:revues toutes pathologies [25 Jan 2019 08:32]
Nguyen Johan [2.1. Piso 2014]
acupuncture:evaluation:revues toutes pathologies [25 Jan 2019 08:33] (Version actuelle)
Nguyen Johan
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 Hempel S, Taylor Sl, Solloway MR, Miake-Lye IM, Beroes JM, Shanman R, Booth MI, Siroka AM, Shekelle PG. Evidence map of acupuncture. VA evidence-based synthesis program reports.2014. {{:medias securises:​acupuncture:​evaluation:​hempel-170098.pdf|}}. <wrap lo>Many Veterans desire complementary and alternative medicine or integrative medicine modalities such as acupuncture,​ both for treatment and for the promotion of wellness. However, the effectiveness and adverse events associated with acupuncture are not firmly established. Given the VA's desire to promote evidence-based practice, this evidence mapping project will help provide guidance to VA leadership about the distribution of evidence to inform policy and clinical decision making. In general, acupuncture is the stimulation of specific acupuncture points through penetration of the skin with needles, which aims to correct imbalances in the flow of qi, a concept of energy in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), through meridians (ie, energy channels). The available published literature on acupuncture is extensive. PubMed searches in 2013 identified almost 20,000 citations with the term “acupuncture” and almost 1,500 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with “acupuncture” in the title. Not surprisingly,​ a large number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been published to-date, and even a number of “reviews of reviews” are available in the published literature on acupuncture in general or for a specific clinical condition. Results from existing reviews of reviews about the effectiveness of acupuncture are non-conclusive. A systematic review of systematic reviews of acupuncture published between 1996 and 2005 included 35 reviews. The overview noted that 12 reviews reported support for acupuncture and 6 reported strong support; however, when applying strict inclusion criteria, such as randomized and double blind studies, good evidence of no benefit was shown. In 2007, Adams compiled a “Brief Overview - A summary of the evidence for use of acupuncture from systematic reviews and meta-analyses” for the Veterans Health Administration Office of Patient Care Services Technology Assessment Program. The report included 42 systematic reviews published since 2002 and concluded that higher quality studies are only beginning to emerge, the evidence base is heterogeneous,​ and the review results highlight the overall poor quality of studies and reporting. Thus, it is timely to assess the current state of reviews of acupuncture.</​wrap>​ Hempel S, Taylor Sl, Solloway MR, Miake-Lye IM, Beroes JM, Shanman R, Booth MI, Siroka AM, Shekelle PG. Evidence map of acupuncture. VA evidence-based synthesis program reports.2014. {{:medias securises:​acupuncture:​evaluation:​hempel-170098.pdf|}}. <wrap lo>Many Veterans desire complementary and alternative medicine or integrative medicine modalities such as acupuncture,​ both for treatment and for the promotion of wellness. However, the effectiveness and adverse events associated with acupuncture are not firmly established. Given the VA's desire to promote evidence-based practice, this evidence mapping project will help provide guidance to VA leadership about the distribution of evidence to inform policy and clinical decision making. In general, acupuncture is the stimulation of specific acupuncture points through penetration of the skin with needles, which aims to correct imbalances in the flow of qi, a concept of energy in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), through meridians (ie, energy channels). The available published literature on acupuncture is extensive. PubMed searches in 2013 identified almost 20,000 citations with the term “acupuncture” and almost 1,500 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with “acupuncture” in the title. Not surprisingly,​ a large number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been published to-date, and even a number of “reviews of reviews” are available in the published literature on acupuncture in general or for a specific clinical condition. Results from existing reviews of reviews about the effectiveness of acupuncture are non-conclusive. A systematic review of systematic reviews of acupuncture published between 1996 and 2005 included 35 reviews. The overview noted that 12 reviews reported support for acupuncture and 6 reported strong support; however, when applying strict inclusion criteria, such as randomized and double blind studies, good evidence of no benefit was shown. In 2007, Adams compiled a “Brief Overview - A summary of the evidence for use of acupuncture from systematic reviews and meta-analyses” for the Veterans Health Administration Office of Patient Care Services Technology Assessment Program. The report included 42 systematic reviews published since 2002 and concluded that higher quality studies are only beginning to emerge, the evidence base is heterogeneous,​ and the review results highlight the overall poor quality of studies and reporting. Thus, it is timely to assess the current state of reviews of acupuncture.</​wrap>​
  
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 +==== Piso 2014 ====
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 +Piso B, Breuer J, Reinsperger I et al. Akupunktur. Einsatzgebiete,​ Evidenzlage und gesicherte Indikationen. Wien: Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Health Technology Assessment (LBI-HTA). 2014;:​114P. ​ {{:medias securises:​acupuncture:​evaluation:​piso-10217.pdf| [10217].}} <wrap lo>​Background and aim Acupuncture is a native of traditional Chinese medicine therapy method that is often used in addition or exclusively for the treatment of diseases. This report deals with the questions in which indications acupuncture is recommended and for which indications evidence exists on the effectiveness of acupuncture in form of (Cochrane) reviews. These results are then compared with 25 approved indications from the Austrian Health Council (Oberster Sanitätsrat,​ OSR), an advisory committee for the Ministry of Health. Methods We identified WHO recommendations or recommendations from professional associations for the use of acupuncture through a web-based hand search. We conducted a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for the „Overview of Cochrane Reviews“. Additionally,​ we carried out a hand-search on recent review articles in PubMed. Results The WHO poses recommendations for the use of acupuncture for a total of 108 indications. The professional associations recommend acupuncture in a wide range of applications. The results of the overview of Cochrane Reviews (a total of 55 Cochrane Reviews were included) show the effectiveness of acupuncture for 2 indications (migraine prophylaxis as well as pelvic and back pain during pregnancy). In 7 indications effectiveness could be given. For 4 indications (epilepsy, irritable bowel syndrome, nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy and assisted reproductive technology) the results of the overview of Cochrane Reviews indicate the ineffectiveness of acupuncture. For 42 indications no statement can be made regarding (in)effectiveness due to missing or inconclusive evidence. Conclusion and recommendation Regarding the 25 OSR indications,​ the comparison of the available evidence shows that effectiveness of acupuncture has been proven for some areas (headaches and migraines, degenerative arthritis, back pain, diseases of the cervical spine, dysmenorrhoea,​ chronic pain). For allergic rhinitis, vomiting in pregnancy, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia one systematic review concluded, that acupuncture was ineffective. Concerning the other OSR-indications no statements on the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of acupuncture can be made.</​wrap>​
 ==== Ernst 2008 ==== ==== Ernst 2008 ====